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Total Economic Value for Protecting and Restoring Hawaiian Coral Reef Ecosystems

Total Economic Value for Protecting and Restoring Hawaiian Coral Reef Ecosystems

This report documents results of a study commissioned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to improve methods for measuring the economic values that the U.S. public places on the protection and restoration of coral reef ecosystems. The work focused on the coral reefs of Hawaii. These reefs are obviously of economic importance to both the state and the nation, yet there has been less economic research focused on the reefs of Hawaii compared to other parts of the United States, particularly Florida, in the past. Several human activities impinge on Hawaii’s coral reefs. In order to gain insights into the public’s values for coral reef protection and restoration, the study focused on impacts from fishing and damage to reefs from ship accidents.

Citation: Richard C. Bishop, David J. Chapman, Barbara J. Kanninen, Jon A. Krosnick, Bob Leeworthy, and Norman F. Meade. 2011. Total Economic Value for Protecting and Restoring Hawaiian Coral Reef Ecosystems: Final Report. Silver Spring, MD: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, Office of Response and Restoration, and Coral Reef Conservation Program. NOAA Technical Memorandum CRCP 16. 406 pp.

Total Economic Value for Protecting and Restoring Hawaiian Coral Reef Ecosystems (full report, pdf, 5 MB)

For more information contact:

coralreef@noaa.gov