CRED Integrated Benthic Habitat Map for Tutuila Island, American Samoa Year 2007

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What does this data set describe?

Title:
CRED Integrated Benthic Habitat Map for Tutuila Island, American Samoa Year 2007
Abstract:
This is an integrated benthic habitat map system which consists of a number of separate map layers including multibeam bathymetry, digital NOAA nautical charts, acoustic backscatter imagery, hyperlinked underwater still photographs and/or video framegrabs of the benthos, seafloor classification results of living cover and substrate from optical imagery and towboard diver observations, derived depth contours, layers of geomorphic information (slope, rugosity, Bathymetric Position Index Structures, and Bathymetric Position Index Zones), Ikonos satellite imagery where available, and terrestrial topography. These data are incorporated into stand alone ArcGIS and ArcReader projects. ArcReader is a software package that can be downloaded and installed free of charge, and enables the user to view and perform limited manipulations of these map layers.
Supplemental_Information:
Tutuila is the largest of seven islands in American Samoa at 142.3 sq. km. Volcanic in origin, it reaches a height of 653m at Matafao Peak. Tutuila is centered at 14.30 S, 169.75 W, has approximately 101.3 km of coastline and an estimated 36.2 sq. km of reef area. The port of Pago Pago is a collapsed crater and is one of the largest natural ports in the Pacific. Pago Pago contains a tuna cannery which is a hub of a large purse-seining tuna fishing fleet. The cannery outputs large amounts of nutrients as byproduct into the waters of Pago Pago Harbor. The human population of Tutuila in 1990 was 45,043. It is classified as a basaltic or a high island and contributes significant nutrient and sediment runoff to coastal waters. Tutuila's waters include the 0.7 sq. km Fagatele Bay National Marine Sanctuary, as well as by the National Park of American Samoa, which covers the north-central part of the island and ~5 sq. km of coastline. Cruises CoRIS Metadata Record Names TC0201 cred_toad_tutuila_2002 OES0402 cred_toad_tutuila_2004

Multibeam data were collected aboard the R/V AHI (Acoustic Habitat Investigator), a 25' survey launch owned and operated by the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center in Honolulu, HI, and aboard the NOAA Ship Hi'ialakai, a 218' United States National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration research ship. The R/V AHI's survey sensors include a 240 kHz Reson 8101-ER, the sonar providing multibeam bathymetry and backscatter data, and a Seabird SBE 19 CTD used to measure sound velocity profiles, whereas the NOAA Ship Hi'ialakai's survey sensors include a 30 kHz Simrad EM300 sonar and a 300 kHz Simrad EM3002d sonar, which provide bathymetry and imagery data, and a Seabird SBE 9/11 plus CTD used to measure sound velocity profiles. Both systems include a TSS/Applanix POS/MV Model 320 which measures position, velocity, attitude and heading. Specific equipment configurations are documented in metadata from cruises: AHI0402, AHI0602, TC0201 and OES0402. These metadata can be accessed at: <http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/pibhmc/pibhmc_cruise>- catalog.htm

Optical imagery of the seafloor is collected primarily to validate the interpretation of benthic habitat characteristics from multibeam echosounder surveys. Optical data were collected using two different methods. In shallow waters of depths between a few meters and 20-30 m, towboard divers with the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) collect video or still imagery while being towed behind a small boat over track lines pre-programmed into a handheld GPS unit. The majority of seafloor in the area is deeper than the approximately 30 m maximum depth attainable by towboard divers. The habitat in these deeper areas is assessed by Towed Optical Assessment Device (TOAD), a sled equipped with underwater video camera, still camera, and lights. Camera sled deployments were conducted at night, usually between 1800 and midnight, to avoid interfering with daytime small boat and diver operations. The TOAD was originally deployed from a pot hauler mounted on the starboard side of the fantail on NOAA Ship Townsend Cromwell. On the NOAA Ships O.E. Sette and Hi'ialakai various iterations of TOADs were deployed off the portside J-frame amidships or the starboard side J-frame respectively. In all cases the sleds were lowered slowly to the bottom by the deck crew with the use of a capstan. The TOAD operator monitored a live video feed from the camera and began recording data on two video tape recorders. When the camera reached bottom the deck crew was notified by radio to stop lowering, and the ship moved off along a predetermined course, towing the TOAD astern for the first TOAD, or by drifting with subsequent camera sleds. The operator continued to monitor the vehicle and provided commands to raise or lower it to keep the camera just above the bottom. Specific equipment configurations are documented in metadata records: cred_toad_tutuila_2002 cred_toad_tutuila_2004 These metadata can be accessed at (Located under Optical Validation): <http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/pibhmc/pibhmc_amsamoa_tutuila_optical.htm>

All collected video is classified for substrate and living cover according to the key, which can be downloaded from: <ftp://ftp.soest.hawaii.edu/pibhmc/website/webdocs/webtext&figures/bh_class_codes.htm>

Geomorphology layers (slope, rugosity, Bathymetric Position Index Strcutures and Zones) are derivates of multibeam bathymetry. These layers may be used for benthic and essential fish habitat characterization, and for the study of geologic features. By combining the dataset with bathymetry, backscatter, other derivatives, and in situ data, they collectively compose benthic habitat maps which are designed to be used to understand and predict moderate depth (~20m - 150m) benthic habitats for different organisms that inhabit coral reef ecosystems.

Benthic habitat layer names, with start and end dates:

Bathymetry, 5 meter grid: 20040130-20060313 Backscatter Imagery, Reson 8101 16 meter grid: 20040217-20060308 Backscatter Imagery, Reson 8101 1 meter grid: 20040217-20060308 Backscatter Imagery, Simrad em3002d 16 meter grid: 20060217-20060224 Backscatter Imagery, Simrad em3002d 1 meter grid: 20060217-20060224 Optical Validation via TOAD video: 20020210-20040226 Optical Validation via Towboard (towed-diver observations): 20020209-20060309 Geomorphology Layers, Slope: 20060430-20070115 Geomorphology Layers, Rugosity: 20060430-20070115 Geomorphology Layers, Bathymetric Position Index Structures: 20040130-20070112 Geomorphology Layers, Bathymetric Position Index Zones: 20040130-20070112 Nautical charts (NOAA Chart # 83484) available for download: <http://chartmaker.ncd.noaa.gov/mcd/Raster/download.htm>

All related information is available in the original form at: <http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/pibhmc/pibhmc_amsamoa_tutuila.htm>

Resource Description: Map layers of bathymetry and other biologically important characteristics of the coral reef ecosystem around Tutuila, American Samoa, incorporated into independent ArcGIS and ArcReader projects.

  1. How should this data set be cited?

    Pacific Islands Benthic Habitat Mapping Center (PIBHMC), Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 20071222, CRED Integrated Benthic Habitat Map for Tutuila Island, American Samoa Year 2007.

    Online Links:

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?

    West_Bounding_Coordinate: -170.92
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -170.49
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: -14.20
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: -14.38

  3. What does it look like?

  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?

    Beginning_Date: Oct-2002
    Ending_Date: 15-Jan-2007
    Currentness_Reference: ground condition

  5. What is the general form of this data set?

    Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: digital maps

  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?

    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?

    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?

  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?


Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)

  2. Who also contributed to the data set?

  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?

    Pacific Islands Benthic Habitat Mapping Center (PIBHMC), Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
    Attn: John Rooney
    NOAA IRC
    Honolulu, HI 96818

    808 725-5360 (voice)
    808 725-5429 (FAX)
    nmfs.pic.credinfo@noaa.gov

    Contact_Instructions: e-mail preferred


Why was the data set created?

These benthic habitat map systems are independent ArcGIS and ArcReader projects that include layers of a wide range of biologically important characteristics of the coral reef ecosystem around the island of Tutuila in American Samoa. They make these data available to scientists and resource managers to enable them to develop unique combinations of data to address specific management and research questions.


How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?

  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?

  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?


How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?


How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?

Access_Constraints: None
Use_Constraints:
These data are not to be used for navigation purposes. Please acknowledge NOAA and the Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (JIMAR) University of Hawaii as the sources of this information.

  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)

    Pacific Islands Benthic Habitat Mapping Center (PIBHMC), Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
    Attn: John Rooney
    NOAA IRC
    Honolulu, HI 96818

    808 725-5360 (voice)
    808 725-5429 (FAX)
    nmfs.pic.credinfo@noaa.gov

    Contact_Instructions: e-mail preferred
  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set?

    Downloadable Data

  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?

    These data are not to be used for navigational purposes. NOAA makes no warranty regarding these data, expressed or implied, nor does the fact of distribution constitute such a warranty. NOAA cannot assume liability for any damages caused by any errors or omissions in these data, nor as a result of the failure of these data to function on a particular system.

  4. How can I download or order the data?


Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 12-Mar-2014
Last Reviewed: 04-May-2009
Metadata author:
Pacific Islands Benthic Habitat Mapping Center (PIBHMC), Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Attn: Gillian Clague
NOAA IRC
Honolulu, HI 96818

808 725-5360 (voice)
808 725-5429 (FAX)
nmfs.pic.credinfo@noaa.gov

Contact_Instructions: e-mail preferred
Metadata standard:
FGDC Content Standards for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC-STD-001-1998)


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